Yasashii Amasa Strawberry Pocky by Glico Japan

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Some people avoid arti­fi­cial fla­vours and col­ours for vari­ous reas­ons. For these people, Yasashii Amasa Strawberry Pocky, or Gentle Sweetness Strawberry Pocky, is a chance to enjoy this pop­u­lar snack as it’s free of arti­fi­cial fla­vours and colours.

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Compared to stand­ard Strawberry Pocky (above, bot­tom), the Yasashii Amasa Strawberry Pocky (above, top) has a whiter bis­cuit enrobed in a paler pink mousse with the same red flecks. These are also fra­grance-free, as they don’t have the bright fruity smell of oth­er straw­berry fla­voured Pocky. Along with being gentle on your nose, these are gentle on your taste buds as well, with a much more mel­low flavour.

The mousse is less sweet and the straw­berry fla­vour is much more mel­low, creamy and milky like a straw­berry milk than in the stand­ard Strawberry Pocky, which tastes of straw­berry ice cream. Mousse aside, the bis­cuit has a flaki­er tex­ture — but not as crispy as that in Otona Milk Pocky — with a but­tery note that lacks the toasty notes of stand­ard Pocky. This but­tery note lingers alone in the aftertaste.

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Overall, Yasashii Amasa Strawberry Pocky is bland, and I’d much prefer the bolder and more obvi­ously straw­berry fla­vours of ordin­ary Strawberry Pretz (even if they are arti­fi­cial) and indeed the punchi­er fla­vours of Tsubu Tsubu Strawberry Pocky. This com­par­is­on goes to show how much of the work done to arrive at bold fla­vours is achieved with arti­fi­cial fla­vours and col­ours. Perhaps I should be more alarmed?

This box of Yasahii Amasa Strawberry Pocky con­tained 1 bag of ~20 bis­cuit sticks. It was pro­duced in Japan and was gif­ted by rel­at­ives vis­it­ing Tokyo, Japan in 2016.