Yaite Oishii Sweet Potato KitKat by Nestle Japan

Candied sweet pota­toes — cubes of sweet potato deep fried till crispy, glazed in a sweet sug­ary syr­up and fin­ished with a sprinkle of black ses­ame seeds — are a deli­cious and tasty snack. Whereas grilled sweet potato (yaki-imo) is a com­mon sight around Japan in autumn, these can­died sweet pota­toes (daigaku-imo, lit­er­ally ‘uni­ver­sity potato’) are pop­u­lar snack often served at uni­ver­sity festivals.

So here, we have Yaite Oishii Sweet Potato KitKat by Nestle Japan, a bake­able type of KitKat.

The back of the pack explains how to pre­pare these bake­able KitKats. When heated in a toast­er, the sug­ar in the chocol­ate solid­i­fies faster than the cocoa melts, res­ult­ing in a KitKat with a dif­fer­ent texture.

The con­struc­tion of the KitKat is stand­ard with two wafers sand­wich­ing a sweet potato cream and enrobed in a sweet potato infused white chocolate.

Without bak­ing — as these can be eaten without a trip to a toast­er — these KitKats have the strong smell of sweet potato and taste immensely sweet with pleas­ant flor­al notes or sweet potato.

To pre­pare these KitKat, place them in the refri­ger­at­or until cool, then unwrap and place on a bak­ing tray lined with alu­mini­um foil. You’ll want to do more than one because they’re tasty and it’s less effort than turn­ing the oven on every time.

The instruc­tions sug­gest pla­cing 3 – 4 min­i­bars into a 1000W oven toast­er for 2 – 2.5 minutes. Oven toast­ers are com­mon in Asia, likely due to space restric­tions. As I don’t have one of them, I placed mine into a fan-forced elec­tric oven pre­heated to 180°C.

About thirty seconds into the oven, the white chocol­ate on the KitKats will melt into a puddle. This is nor­mal as is the deli­cious smell of car­a­mel­ising sugar.

Give it anoth­er minute or so and the chocol­ate will bubble slightly before start­ing to crisp up around the edges of the puddle. Wait anoth­er minute for the KitKat to turn a golden brown before remov­ing from the oven.

The top did not brown any fur­ther after crisp­ing at 4 minutes.

The bot­tom, how­ever, became a beau­ti­ful golden brown.

The res­ult­ing KitKat looks more like a cook­ie than a chocol­ate bar.

The KitKat smell of freshly baked cook­ie with a car­a­mel­ised sug­ar crust. On tast­ing, it’s deli­ciously crispy — more so than an ordin­ary KitKat straight from the fridge — with the sweet flor­al and earthy fla­vour of sweet potato devel­op­ing in the body, with a linger­ing car­a­mel after­taste. The hardened enrob­ing chocol­ate does not melt in your mouth as in a nor­mal KitKat, while the sand­wich­ing cream takes on a gritty tex­ture not present before bak­ing, thus allow­ing the KitKat to retain its crumbly cook­ie tex­ture through­out. The over­all fla­vour recalls the deli­ciously sticky yet crunchy crust of a daigaku-imo.

These KitKat can also be baked ahead of time, as they retain their tasty crispi­ness the next day if stored in an air-tight con­tain­er after allow­ing to cool.

This pack of Yaite Oishii Sweet Potato KitKat by Nestle Japan con­tained 13 min­i­bars. It was pro­duced in Japan and pur­chased in Osaka, Japan in 2015.