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Japan Greentea Co Sweet Sakura Tea

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Blooming teas are the most beau­ti­ful to make, visu­ally. Here I have Japan Greentea Co Sweet Sakura Tea.

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The sak­ura blos­soms come in a sealed foil sachet. They’ve been pre­served in salt, with a few salt crys­tals still vis­ible, and take on a sort of bruise col­our. They’re not at all pretty out of the foil.

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Pouring freshly boiled water over the blos­soms bring them to life…

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…and the petals quickly unfurl.…

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… to resemble the cherry blos­soms they once were. The petals lose their bruise col­our and become more of a trans­lu­cent pink. It’s a very fem­in­ine tea.

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The trans­lu­cent pink of the petals comes through as the slight­est hint of pink in the clear liquor after infus­ing three blos­soms in 100 ml of just boiled water for 1 minute. It has a salty and sour taste from the head right through to the after­taste that reminds one of apricots and almonds pre­served in brine. These flor­al notes of sak­ura I enjoy, but the briny, mar­ine fla­vour from the salt used to pre­serve the sak­ura is bold — too bold — and stops me from enjoy­ing it. I used to believe that the taste of sak­ura teas could be acquired, but I’m now con­vinced that it’s unpleas­ant and just not for me. That said, it is one of the pret­ti­est teas I own.

This box of Japan Greentea Co Sweet Sakura Tea con­tained 6 tea bags. It was packed in Japan and was pur­chased in Osaka, Japan in 2014.